Arizona Laws on Regulation and Licensing of Veterinarians


Arizona laws on regulation and licensing of veterinarians can be found in Chapter 21, Title 32 of Arizona statutes.  Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2202, an Arizona state veterinary medical examining board is established consisting of nine members appointed by the governor.  Each member serves for a term of five years.  After notice and a hearing before the governor, a member of the board may be removed on a finding by the governor of continued neglect of duty, incompetence or unprofessional or dishonorable conduct.  Five members must be licensed veterinarians who have an established practice location in Arizona or are employed by a university or a political subdivision of the state and who have resided and practiced in the state for five years immediately preceding appointment, no more than three of whom shall be from the same veterinary college.  Four members must be lay persons, three representing the general public and one representing the livestock industry.  A person who has been convicted of a violation of any provision of this chapter is ineligible for appointment[i].

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2205, the veterinary medical examining board fund is established. Pursuant to sections 35-146 and 35-147, the board deposits ten per cent of all fees and other revenue accruing to the board in the state general fund and deposit the remaining 90% in the veterinary medical examining board fund.

Powers and Duties of Arizona State Veterinary Medical Examining Board

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2207, the primary duty of the board is to protect the public from unlawful, incompetent, unqualified, impaired or unprofessional practitioners of veterinary medicine through licensure and regulation of the profession in this state. The powers and duties of the board include:

1) Administering and enforcing this chapter and board rules.
2) Regulating disciplinary actions, the granting, denial, revocation, renewal and suspension of licenses and certificates and the rehabilitation of licensees and certificate holders pursuant to this chapter and board rules.
3) Prescribing the forms, content and manner of application for licensure and certification and renewal of licensure and certification and setting deadlines for the receipt of materials required by the board.
4) Keeping a record of all licensees and certificate holders, board actions taken concerning all applicants, licensees and certificate holders and the receipt and disbursal of monies.
5) Adopting an official seal for attestation of licenses, certificates and other official papers and documents.
6) Investigating charges of violations of this chapter and board rules and orders.
7) Employing an executive director who serves at the pleasure of the board.
8) Adopting rules pursuant to title 41, chapter 6 that relate to the qualifications and regulation of doctors of veterinary medicine, veterinary technicians, veterinary premises, mobile veterinary clinics and crematories and other rules that the board deems necessary for the administration of this chapter. The rules may include continuing education requirements for licensees and certificate holders and shall include:

(a) Minimum standards of veterinary practice.
(b) Provisions to ensure that the public has reasonable access to nonconfidential information about the licensing or certification status of persons regulated under this chapter and about resolved complaints against licensees and certificate holders.
(c) Provisions to ensure that members of the public have an opportunity to evaluate the services that the board provides to the public.
9) Establishing by rule fees and penalties, including fees for the following:
(a) Reproduction of documents.
(b) Verification of information about a licensed veterinarian at the request of a veterinary licensing board in another jurisdiction.
(c) Return of checks due to insufficient funds, an order to stop payment or a closed account.
(d) Provision of a list of the names of veterinarians, veterinary technicians or veterinary premises licensed or certified by the board.
10) Adopting rules that require the board to inform members of the public about the existence of the office of the ombudsdman-citizens aide.

Licensing

Chapter 21 does not apply to:

1) A commissioned veterinary medical officer of the United States armed services, or employees of the animal disease eradication division of the United States department of agriculture.
2) A person treating an animal belonging to himself or his employer while in the regular service of such employer, or the animal of another without compensation therefor.  Animals consigned by their legal owner for feeding or care to consignment livestock operations shall be considered to be the property of the consignee.
3) A licensed veterinarian of another state or foreign country consulting with a licensed veterinarian in this state.
4) A veterinary student regularly enrolled in the final half of the veterinary curriculum in any veterinary college approved by the American veterinary medical association and working under the direct and personal instruction, control or supervision of a licensed veterinarian, if such student’s compensation is paid solely by such veterinarian.  Such student may perform those acts of health care that are assigned by the veterinarian having responsibility for the care of the animal. The student is not permitted to perform anesthesia or surgery unless the student is directly assisting the supervising licensed veterinarian who is performing the anesthesia or surgery.
5) A veterinary assistant employed by a licensed veterinarian performing duties other than diagnosis, prognosis, prescription or surgery under the direction and supervision of such veterinarian who is responsible for such assistant’s performance.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2212, if the applicant satisfactorily passes the examination given by the board, demonstrates a scientific and practical knowledge of the art and science of veterinary medicine and, in addition, complies with the provisions of this chapter, the board must issue a license to the applicant to practice veterinary medicine in Arizona.

A.R.S. § 32-2212 provides that the board must deny licensure to an applicant who has satisfied all licensing requirements but who has not submitted the license issuance fee within 12 months after the date of the examination. An applicant who fails to submit the fee within that time forfeits his or her qualification for licensure and the applicant must reapply for licensure.

A.R.S. § 32-2212 provides that all persons presently licensed to practice veterinary medicine in the state of Arizona who have complied with the provisions of law existing prior to June 12, 1967 is considered as licensed veterinarians under this chapter and the names of such licensees must be entered upon the official register kept by the board.

A person must not append any letters to such person’s name, indicating a degree in veterinary medicine, such as D.V.M. or V.M.D., or use the word doctor, veterinary, veterinarian, professor, animal doctor, animal surgeon, or any abbreviation or combination thereof of similar import in connection with such person’s name, or any trade name in the conduct of any occupation or profession pertaining to the diagnosis or treatment of animal diseases or conditions, unless such person is licensed to practice veterinary medicine[ii].

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2213, a person desiring to practice veterinary medicine or surgery must make a written application to the board for a license to practice.

A.R.S. § 32-2215 provides that an applicant for a license must:

1) Be of good moral character.
2) Be a graduate of a veterinary college that is accredited by the American veterinary medical association or hold a certificate issued by the educational commission for foreign veterinary graduates, the program for the assessment of veterinary education equivalence or a foreign graduate testing program approved by the board.
3) Satisfactorily pass an examination given by the board as provided in this chapter.

The board may waive the examination and may issue a license by endorsement to an applicant to practice veterinary medicine if the applicant provides all required documentation pursuant to section 32-2213 and meets the following requirements:

1) The applicant holds an active license in one or more other states and submits verification that the applicant has previously taken and passed the examination required by section 32-2214, with a score at least equal to the score required to pass in this state. An applicant who received original licensure before the examination required by section 32-2214 was required in the state in which the applicant was originally licensed may be eligible for licensure without having taken that examination as required pursuant to this chapter if all other requirements are met.
2) The applicant has been lawfully and actively engaged in the practice of veterinary medicine for at least three of the preceding five years or six of the preceding ten years in one or more states before filing an application for licensure in this state.
3) The applicant has graduated from a veterinary college recognized by the board.
4) The applicant passes a state examination approved by the board.  A grade of at least 75% is required to successfully pass the examination.
5) The applicant pays a fee for the license of $750.

A.R.S. § 32-2215 provides that the board may waive the examination requirements and may issue a specialty license to an applicant to practice veterinary medicine if the applicant provides all required documentation and meets the following requirements:

1) The applicant holds a current certification as a diplomate of a national specialty board or college recognized by the American veterinary medical association.
2) The applicant’s practice is limited to the scope of the applicant’s board certification.
3) The applicant successfully passes a state examination approved by the board with a score of at least 75%.
4) The applicant pays a fee for the specialty license of seven hundred fifty dollars.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2216, applicants for a license may be issued temporary permits by the board, who at the time of application are graduates of a veterinary college.  The temporary permit entitles the applicant to engage in the active practice of veterinary medicine as an employee of a licensed veterinarian, the state or any county or municipality.  Temporary permit is not valid beyond the time for the next license examination for which the applicant is qualified. The holder of a temporary permit must be examined and satisfactorily pass the license examination next following the issuance of the permit and duly receive a license in order to continue active professional practice. No more than two temporary permits must be issued to one individual. If an employer, for any reason, terminates the employment of the applicant, the employing veterinarian must notify the board and the temporary permit is immediately void.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2217.01, the board may issue to a person residing within twenty-five miles of Arizona in the state of California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico or Utah, who is licensed to practice veterinary medicine in the state of residence and whose practice extends into Arizona, a permit in the form prescribed by the board authorizing such extended practice in Arizona.  The permit expires on December 31 of every even numbered year unless suspended or revoked.  The fee for issuance of the permit is $50 in even numbered years and $100 in odd numbered years. The biennial renewal fee is $100.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2218,, a license remains in effect until December 31 of every even-numbered year unless suspended or revoked.  On submittal of an application for renewal and payment of a renewal fee, a license is renewed for two years.  Failure to pay the license fee before February 1 following expiration of the license is a forfeiture of the license, and the license must not be restored except upon written application to the board and payment of a penalty fee of $50 in addition to all regular license fees and past due fees owed to the board.  A person applying for reinstatement of a license within 36 months of expiration is not required to submit to an examination because of failure to pay the license fee.  However, it is unlawful for a person to practice veterinary medicine or any branch of veterinary medicine during the period in which the person’s license has been forfeited by reason of nonpayment of the license fee.  If an applicant for reinstatement of a license has not completed the continuing education requirements, a license may be reinstated if the continuing education requirements are completed within six months of reinstatement.

Regulation

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2231, a person is regarded as practicing veterinary medicine, surgery and dentistry who,:

1) By advertisement, or by any notice, sign or other indication, or by a statement written, printed or oral, in public or in private, made, done or procured by himself or herself or any other at his or her  request claims, announces, makes known or pretends his or her ability or willingness to diagnose any animal condition, disease, deformity, defect, wound or injury or to perform any type of surgical procedure on animals.
2)  Advertises or makes known or claims his or her ability and willingness to perform the following for hire, fee, compensation or reward that is directly or indirectly promised, offered, expected, received or accepted:

a) Prescribe or administer any drug, medicine, treatment, method or practice for any animal.
b) Perform any operation or manipulation on or apply any apparatus or appliance to any animal.
c) Give any instruction or demonstration for the cure, amelioration, correction or reduction or modification of any animal condition, disease, deformity, defect, wound or injury.
3) Diagnoses or prognosticates any animal condition, disease, deformity, defect, wound or injury for hire, fee, reward or compensation that is directly or indirectly promised, offered, expected, received or accepted.
4) Prescribes or administers any drug, medicine, treatment, method or practice, performs any operation or manipulation, or applies any apparatus or appliance for the cure, amelioration, correction or modification of any animal condition, disease, deformity, defect, wound or injury for hire, fee, compensation or reward that is directly or indirectly promised, offered, expected, received or accepted.

However, the section does not apply to

1) Duly authorized representatives of the United States department of agriculture in the discharge of any duty authorized by the director in charge of the animal disease eradication division.
2) A certified veterinary technician performing a task or function authorized by the rules of the board in the employ of and under the direction, supervision and control of a licensed veterinarian.
3) An equine dental practitioner if all of the following apply:
(a) The equine dental practitioner is certified by the international association of equine dentistry or the academy of equine dentistry.
(b) The equine dental practitioner performs any of the following procedures under the general supervision of a licensed veterinarian:
(i) The application of any apparatus used to work on the oral cavity.
(ii) The examination of dental conditions.
(iii) The removal of overgrowth from the teeth of horses and the removal of sharp enamel points from the teeth of horses, excluding any extractions unless the certified equine dental practitioner is under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian.
(iv) Any treatment of the oral cavity as authorized by the animal’s owner, excluding any extractions unless the certified equine dental practitioner is under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian.
(c) The equine dental practitioner provides both of the following to the board:
(i) Proof of current certification from the international association of equine dentistry or the academy of equine dentistry.
(ii) A written statement signed by the supervising licensed veterinarian that the certified equine dental practitioner will be under the general or direct supervision of the licensed veterinarian when performing the procedures prescribed by this paragraph.
(d) Both the supervising licensed veterinarian and the certified equine dental practitioner maintain dental charts for procedures done pursuant to this paragraph.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2232, unprofessional or dishonorable conduct includes:

1. The fraudulent use of any certificate or other official form used in practice that would increase the hazard of dissemination of disease, the transportation of diseased animals or the sale of inedible food products of animal origin for human consumption.
2. Inadequate methods in violation of meat inspection procedures prescribed by the federal government and Arizona meat inspection laws or wilful neglect or misrepresentation in the inspection of meat.
3. Misrepresentation of services rendered.
4. Failure to report, or the negligent handling of, the serious epidemic diseases of animals, such as anthrax, rabies, glanders, brucellosis, tuberculosis, foot and mouth disease, hog cholera, and other communicable diseases known to medical science as being a menace to human or animal health.
5. The dispensing or giving to anyone of live culture or attenuated live virus vaccines to be administered by a layman without providing instruction as to their administration and use.
6. Having professional connection with, or lending one’s name to, any illegal practitioner of veterinary medicine and the various branches thereof.
7. Chronic inebriety or unlawful use of narcotics, dangerous drugs or controlled substances.
8. Fraud or dishonesty in applying or reporting on any test or vaccination for disease in animals.
9. False, deceptive or misleading advertising, having for its purpose or intent deception or fraud.
10. Conviction of a crime involving moral turpitude, or conviction of a felony.
11. Malpractice, gross incompetence or gross negligence in the practice of veterinary medicine.
12. Violation of the ethics of the profession as defined by rules adopted by the board.
13. Fraud or misrepresentation in procuring a license.
14. Knowingly signing a false affidavit.
15. Distribution of narcotics, dangerous drugs, prescription-only drugs or controlled substances for other than legitimate purposes.
16. Violation of or failure to comply with any state or federal laws or regulations relating to the storing, labeling, prescribing or dispensing of controlled substances or prescription-only drugs as defined in section 32-1901.
17. Offering, delivering, receiving or accepting any rebate, refund, commission, preference, patronage, dividend, discount or other consideration, whether in the form of money or otherwise, as compensation or inducement for referring animals or services to any person.
18. Violating or attempting to violate, directly or indirectly, or assisting or abetting the violation or conspiracy to violate any of the provisions of this chapter, a rule adopted by the board or a written order of the board.
19. Failing to dispense drugs and devices in compliance with article 7 of this chapter.
20. Performing veterinary services without adequate equipment and sanitation considering the type of veterinary services provided.
21. Failure to maintain adequate records of veterinary services provided.
22. Medical incompetence in the practice of veterinary medicine.
23. Cruelty to or neglect of animals.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2233, the board, by majority consent, may revoke or suspend a permit or license granted to any person or may impose a civil penalty of not to exceed $1,000 against any veterinarian or the responsible veterinarian, or both, for:

1) Unprofessional or dishonorable conduct.
2) Publicly professing to cure or treat diseases of a highly contagious, infectious and incurable nature.
3) Curing or treating an injury or deformity in such a way as to deceive the public.
4) Testing any animal for any communicable disease and knowingly stating verbally or in writing that the animals are diseased or in a disease-free condition if the statement is contrary to the indication of the test made.

The board, may sanction any of the following conduct as an administrative violation, rather than unprofessional conduct, and may impose a civil penalty of not more than $1,000 for either of the following:

1) Failure to timely renew the veterinary license or the premises license while continuing to practice veterinary medicine or conducting business from that premises.
2) Failure to notify the board in writing within twenty days of any change in residence, practice, ownership, management or responsible veterinarian.

The civil penalties collected must be deposited in the state general fund.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2234, if the board receives information indicating that a veterinarian may have engaged in unprofessional or dishonorable conduct, and if it appears after investigation that the information may be true, the board may issue a notice of formal hearing or the board may request an informal interview with the veterinarian.  If the veterinarian refuses the interview, and other evidence relating to the veterinarian’s professional competence indicates that disciplinary action should be taken other than suspension or revocation of the veterinarian’s license, or if the veterinarian accepts the informal interview and the informal interview and other evidence relating to the veterinarian’s professional competence indicate that disciplinary action should be taken other than suspension or revocation of the veterinarian’s license, the board may take any or all of the following actions:

1) Issue a decree of censure.
2) Fix a period and terms of probation as are best adapted to protect the public and rehabilitate or educate the veterinarian. The terms of probation may include temporary suspension, for not to exceed thirty days, or restriction of the veterinarian’s license to practice. The failure to comply with any term of the probation is cause to consider the entire case plus any other alleged violations of this chapter at a formal hearing pursuant to title 41, chapter 6, article 10.
3) Impose a civil penalty of not to exceed $1,000 per violation.

If, upon investigation, informal interview or formal hearing of a veterinarian, the board has concern for the veterinarian’s conduct but has not found the veterinarian’s conduct in violation of section 32-2232, the board in its discretion may issue a letter of concern to the veterinarian regarding the veterinarian’s conduct or issue a nondisciplinary order requiring the licensee to complete a prescribed number of hours of continuing education in an area or areas prescribed by the board to provide the licensee with the necessary understanding of current developments, skills, procedures or treatment.

A.R.S. § 32-2234 provides that the board may enter into a consent agreement with a veterinarian either before or after conducting an informal interview. Pursuant to a consent agreement, the board may take any of the disciplinary actions listed in subsection A, paragraphs 1, 2 and 3 of this section or may act to otherwise limit or restrict the veterinarian’s practice or to rehabilitate the veterinarian.

A.R.S. § 32-2234 provides that if the board finds, based on information it receives, that public or animal health, safety or welfare requires emergency action, and incorporates a finding that emergency action is necessary in its order, the board may order summary suspension of a license pending proceedings for revocation or other action.  If the board orders a summary suspension, the board must serve the licensee with a written notice that states the charges and that the licensee is entitled to a formal hearing before the board or an administrative law judge within 60 days.  Before a permit or license may be revoked or suspended for any, other than by terms of probation, the board must serve notice and conduct a hearing.  After service of notice of the decision of the board suspending or revoking a license, censuring a licensee, placing a licensee on probation or dismissing the complaint, the licensee may apply for a rehearing or review by filing a motion.  The filing of a motion for rehearing suspends the operation of the board’s action in suspending or revoking a license or censuring or placing a licensee on probation and allows the licensee to continue to practice as a veterinarian pending denial or granting of the motion and pending the decision of the board on rehearing if the motion is granted.  Any party aggrieved by a final order or decision of the board may appeal to the superior court[iii].

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2236, the board, by majority consent, may refuse to issue or renew a permit or license for any of the causes prescribed in section 32-2233.  The procedure for refusal to issue or renew a license or permit, or both, is as provided in section 32-2234.  If a permit or license is not issued or renewed, such person may not apply for a permit or license until six months have elapsed from the date of refusal, and the new application must be accompanied with the regular examination fee and the license fee.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2237, the board appoints one or more investigative committees, each consisting of three members of the general public who are not board members and two licensed veterinarians who are not board members.  The investigative committee may interview witnesses, gather evidence and otherwise investigate any charges accusing any person of violating any of the provisions of this chapter.  An assistant attorney general shall advise the investigative committee on all questions of law arising out of its investigations.   The investigative committee prepares a written report relating to any charge it investigates.  The committee presents its report to the board in an open meeting.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2237, upon the complaint of any citizen, or upon its own initiative, the board may investigate any alleged violation of this chapter.  If after investigation the board has probable cause to believe that an unlicensed person is performing acts that are required to be performed by a person licensed pursuant to this chapter, the board may take one or more of the following enforcement actions:

1) Issue a cease and desist order.
2) Request the county attorney or attorney general to file criminal charges against the person.
3) File an action in the superior court to enjoin the person from engaging in the unlicensed practice of veterinary medicine.
4) After notice and an opportunity for a hearing, impose a civil penalty of not more than $1,000 for each violation.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2238, a person is guilty of a class 1 misdemeanor who:

1) Practices veterinary medicine or surgery under an assumed name.
2) Falsely impersonates another practitioner.
3) Fraudulently obtains a veterinary medical diploma, license or record of registration.
4) Practices veterinary medicine or surgery without a license and registration.
5) Unlawfully assumes or advertises a veterinary title conveying the impression that the person is a lawful practitioner.
6) Knowingly violates any other provision of this chapter.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2239, a veterinarian must report in writing concerning any dog fighting or animal abuse to a local law enforcement agency in the county where the veterinarian is practicing within 30 days of any examination or treatment administered to any dog or any animal which the veterinarian reasonably suspects and believes has participated in an organized dog fight or any animal which the veterinarian reasonably suspects and believes has been abused.  A veterinarian must report, in writing, suspected cases of abuse of livestock to the associate director of the division of animal services in the Arizona department of agriculture.  A veterinarian who files a report is immune from civil liability with respect to any report made in good faith.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2240, any person may report to the board any information the person has that appears to show that a veterinarian is or may be medically incompetent or is or may be guilty of unprofessional conduct and animal abuse.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2240.01, if an animal dies in the care of a veterinarian or an animal’s owner brings a dead animal to a veterinarian and the animal’s owner requests that the animal be buried, the veterinarian must notify the owner if the burial is to be done in a landfill.

Certification of Veterinary Technician

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2241, a veterinary technician may perform those services authorized by the board in the employ of and under the direction, supervision and control of a licensed veterinarian who is responsible for the performance of the veterinary technician.  Compensation for such authorized services shall be derived solely from the employing veterinarian.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2242, a person desiring to be certified as a veterinary technician must make written application to the board upon a form furnished by the board.  The applicant must be of good moral character and at least eighteen years of age and must furnish one of the following:

1) Satisfactory evidence of graduation from a two-year curriculum in veterinary technology, or the equivalent of such graduation as determined by the board, in a college or other institution approved by the board.
2) Satisfactory evidence that the applicant has been employed for at least two years as a veterinary assistant under the supervision of a veterinarian regularly licensed in Arizona and is recommended to the board by the employing veterinarian or veterinarians.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2244, an applicant who passes the examination prescribed by the board must, upon payment of the fee established by the board, receive a certificate in a form prescribed by the board.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2247, an expired certificate may be renewed at any time within five years after its expiration on filing of application for renewal on a form prescribed by the board and payment of the renewal fee.  If the certificate is renewed more than 30 days after its expiration, the applicant as a condition precedent to renewal must also pay the delinquency fee established by the board.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2249, the board may revoke or suspend a certificate or place a technician on probation for any of the following reasons:

1) The employment of fraud, misrepresentation or deception in obtaining certification.
2) Conviction on a charge of cruelty to animals or conviction of a felony, in which case the record of such conviction will be conclusive evidence.
3) Chronic inebriety or habitual use of narcotics, dangerous drugs or controlled substances.
4) Gross ignorance or inefficiency in connection with the performance of technical procedures in veterinary medicine.
5) Representing himself or herself as a doctor of veterinary medicine.
6) Violating or attempting to violate, directly or indirectly, or assisting or abetting the violation or conspiracy to violate any of the provisions of this chapter, a rule adopted under this chapter or a written order of the board issued pursuant to this chapter.
7) Practicing veterinary medicine.
8) Gross incompetence or gross negligence.
9) Following orders that are in violation of this chapter or rules adopted pursuant to this chapter.

In an emergency, a technician may render emergency care or first aid if the technician is supervised telephonically by a licensed veterinarian or until a licensed veterinarian arrives.

Emergency Aid

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2261, any person licensed or certified who gratuitously and in good faith gives emergency treatment to a sick or injured animal at the scene of an emergency is not liable in damages to the owner of such animal in the absence of gross negligence.

Registration of Veterinary Medical Premises

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2271, a person must not provide veterinary services, including diagnosis, treatment, dentistry, surgery or dispensing prescription-only veterinary drugs, to the public without a license issued by the board.  A premises license is for a fixed location where a veterinarian retains the records of a veterinary practice, stores veterinary equipment or offers veterinary services to the public.  A responsible veterinarian who holds a premises license may provide veterinary services to the public at the licensed fixed location and any temporary site in this state at which adequate equipment and sanitation are available considering the type of veterinary medical services provided.  A veterinarian shall obtain a separate premises license for each fixed location at which veterinary services are regularly offered to the public.

A.R.S. § 32-2271 provides that the board must inspect all fixed locations before issuing a premises license. Adequate equipment and sanitation must be available for use at any location which is necessary to provide the range of veterinary services which the veterinarian proposes to offer.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2272, any person who desires to establish premises at or from which veterinary services are offered to the public must file with the board an application for a veterinary premises license accompanied by the license fee.
A license is valid only for the responsible veterinarian to whom it is issued.  A license is not subject to sale, assignment or transfer, voluntary or involuntary.

A license expires on December 31 of every even-numbered year unless suspended or revoked.  A license is renewable for two years upon payment of the renewal fee. If the renewal fee is not paid before February 1 following the expiration of the license, a penalty fee of $100 must be paid in addition to the renewal fee before the premises may be relicensed.

A.R.S. § 32-2272 provides that the premises owner is subject to a civil penalty of not more than one thousand dollars for each violation of the requirements of this chapter or rules adopted by the board.  The total penalty shall not exceed five thousand dollars.  If the responsible veterinarian is only an employee, the premises owner is subject to a civil penalty of not more than one thousand dollars for each violation of this article.  The total penalty shall not exceed $5,000.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2274, the board may take disciplinary action against the responsible veterinarian, may place the responsible veterinarian on probation or may revoke, suspend, refuse to issue or refuse to renew a premises license for any of the following grounds:

1) Failure to notify the board in writing within 20 days of a change of ownership, management or responsible veterinarian.
2)  Failure to maintain clean and sanitary facilities for the performance of services in accordance with the rules adopted by the board.
3) A violation of section 32-2233 or any rule adopted pursuant to that section.
4) Failure to maintain accurate records or reports as required by this chapter or by federal or state laws and rules pertaining to the storing, labeling, selling, dispensing, prescribing and administering of controlled substances.
5) Failure to maintain veterinary medical supplies, controlled substances and surgical and other equipment in a safe, efficient and sanitary manner.
6) Failure to keep written records of all animals receiving veterinary services, failure to provide a summary of such records upon request to the client or failure to produce such records at the request of the board.
7) Revocation or suspension of the license to practice veterinary medicine of the responsible veterinarian holding the veterinary medical premises license.
8) Failure of the responsible veterinarian to maintain a current license to practice veterinary medicine.
9) Failure of the responsible veterinarian to maintain a current premises license to provide veterinary services to the public at a fixed location.
10) Failure of emergency or 24 hour facilities to give copies of medical records to the owner or the owner’s agent on release of an animal.
If the board receives information indicating that disciplinary action should be taken against the responsible veterinarian or a veterinary premises license, and if it appears after investigation that the information may be true, the board may issue a notice of formal hearing or the board may hold an informal interview.  If the results of the informal interview indicate suspension or revocation of the responsible veterinarian’s license or the premises license or other action may be in order, the board must issue a notice of formal hearing.  If the informal interview and other evidence indicate that disciplinary action should be taken other than suspension or revocation, the board may take any one or a combination of the following actions:

1) Issue a decree of censure.
2) Fix such period and terms of probation as are best adapted to protect the public and rehabilitate or educate the responsible veterinarian or veterinary premises license holder.  The terms of probation may include temporary suspension for not to exceed thirty days.  The failure to comply with any term of the probation is cause to consider the entire case plus any other alleged violations of this chapter at a formal hearing pursuant to title 41, chapter 6, article 10.
3) Impose a civil penalty of not more than $1,000 for each violation.

Before a license may be revoked or suspended for any cause, the board must serve notice and conduct a hearing in the manner prescribed by title 41, chapter 6, article 10.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2291, an animal crematory license must be for a fixed location where animal cremation occurs.  A person who holds an animal crematory license may provide animal cremation services to the public at the licensed fixed location.  There must be a separate animal crematory license for each fixed location at which animal cremation services are regularly offered to the public.  The board must inspect all fixed locations before issuing an animal crematory license.  Adequate equipment and sanitation must be available for use at any location that is necessary to provide the animal cremation services offered.  The board may inspect any animal crematory licensed pursuant to this article.

Licensure of Animal Crematories

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2292, any person who desires to establish premises at or from which animal cremation services are offered to the public must file with the board an application for an animal crematory license accompanied by the license fee.  The application must be on a form prescribed and furnished by the board.  A license is not subject to sale, assignment or transfer, voluntary or involuntary.  A license is not valid for any animal crematory other than that for which it is issued. If there are major changes in the scope of animal crematory services offered, the animal crematory is subject to reinspection.

A.R.S. § 32-2292 provides that a change of responsible owner cancels an animal crematory license.  The responsible owner shall surrender the animal crematory license to the board within 20 days after the change in responsible owner.  The failure of the responsible owner to notify the board in writing within twenty days after a change in responsible owner is grounds for disciplinary action.

A.R.S. § 32-2292 provides that a license expires on December 31 of every even numbered year unless suspended or revoked.  A license is renewable for two years on payment of the renewal fee.  If the renewal fee is not paid before February 1 following the expiration of the license, a penalty fee of $100 must be paid in addition to the renewal fee before the animal crematory may be relicensed.

Pursuant to A.R.S. § 32-2294, the board may take disciplinary action against the animal crematory, including revoking, suspending, refusing to issue or refusing to renew an animal crematory license for any of the following grounds:

1) Failure to notify the board in writing within twenty days after a change of the person who owns the animal crematory or the person responsible for the operation of the animal crematory.
2) Failure to maintain clean and sanitary facilities for the performance of services in accordance with the rules adopted by the board.
3) Failure to keep written records of all animals receiving crematory services, failure to provide a summary of the records on request to the client or failure to produce the records at the request of the board.
4) Failure to maintain a current animal crematory license to provide crematory services to the public at a fixed location.

A.R.S. § 32-2294 provides that if the board receives information indicating that disciplinary action should be taken against an animal crematory license and if it appears after investigation that the information may be true, the board may issue a notice of formal hearing or the board may hold an informal interview.  If the results of the informal interview indicate suspension or revocation of the animal crematory license or other action may be in order, the board must issue a notice of formal hearing and proceed pursuant to title 41, chapter 6, article 10.  If the informal interview and other evidence indicate that disciplinary action should be taken other than suspension or revocation, the board may take any one or a combination of the following actions:

1) Issue a decree of censure.
2) Fix such period and terms of probation as are best adapted to protect the public and rehabilitate or educate the animal crematory licensee.  The terms of probation may include temporary suspension not to exceed 30 days.  The failure to comply with any term of the probation is cause to consider the entire case and any other alleged violations of this chapter at a formal hearing pursuant to title 41, chapter 6, article 10.
3) Impose a civil penalty of not more than $1,000 for each violation.  The total penalty must not exceed $5,000.

[i] A.R.S. § 32-2202.

[ii] A.R.S. § 32-2212.

[iii] A.R.S. § 32-2234.